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The 9 Largest Trees In Australia

There are many trees in Australia, most of which are native to the country. Some of these can be seen as remarkable specimens that tower over the land they inhabit. Of all the types of Australian flora, some stand out as particularly huge. These are known as ‘arboreal giants’.

According to tree services Canberra owner Llewyn Dowling, the trees of Australia are often spectacular landmarks in themselves, encouraging healthy growth of local ecosystems. They are also important to the cultural identity of their surrounding communities.

The following list focuses on the biggest trees native to Australia.

Eastern Australian Brush Box

The largest tree in terms of wood volume in Australia and among the 30+ largest known hardwood species on earth, weighing more than 1 million kilograms, with an average diameter exceeding 3 metres! It can grow up to 80 or 90 metres high. They often live over 400 years but some have been dated to over 1000 years old.

Australian Mountain Ash

One of the giants native to Australia, a quick look at these trees and their trunks reveals some very interesting mathematical properties. Their circumference can reach 9 metres across, with the tallest recorded measuring almost 100 metres! They are among the fastest-growing eucalyptus trees and can live up to 500 or 600 years although such sizes are not typical for this species of tree.

New Zealand Kauri

The third-largest angiosperm (flowering plant) by wood volume in the entire world, reaching more than 40 metres tall and 4 metres in diameter for larger individuals. This majestic tree is found only on expeditions into Northland and its surrounding regions and has not been recorded in Waipoua Forest since 1987.

Kurrimine Beach Blackbutt

These blackbutts grow so big they even have a street named after them! This is one of the largest trees found on private property and it is believed to be over 600 years old. It measures 9 metres around its trunk and reaches 40 metres tall, with a bole length of 21 metres!

Australian Blue Gum

The species we are talking about here is called “Eucalyptus deanei”, and it can measure up to nearly 50 metres high and 4 or 5 metres around its trunk, weighing roughly 170 tonnes. Such measurements make these blue gums one of the tallest hardwood trees in the world.

Black Olive Pine

Found only in Queensland, Australia, the black olive tree is a relative of the kauri and can reach nearly 70 metres in height! It is one of the largest trees in Australia by volume and has been measured at 1.5 million kilograms with an average diameter trunk of 2.4 metres.

Southern Sassafras

This iconic Australian species can grow up to 80 or 90 metres tall and 9 metres around its trunk which makes it one of the tallest angiosperms on earth. Its wood is so dense and resistant that this tree survived many cyclones without falling until finally succumbing to natural decay.

Bunya Pine

More than 100 years ago these giant pines were much more widespread throughout Eastern Australia but their numbers have been dwindling ever since. The few that remain are found in Southern Queensland and New South Wales, where adults can reach nearly 60 metres in height and a trunk circumference of 13 metres!

Australian Red Cedar

Its wood is so famous among boat builders that its name has even crossed over into common parlance as a synonym for quality or excellence. This majestic tree can grow up to 40 metres tall with an average diameter of 2.5 metres, but the record goes to the tallest specimen which reached 61 metres!

Tasmanian Tree Fern

Although it belongs to a group of plants known as ferns, this species produces trunks like those of trees whose heights can reach 20 or 25 metres on some occasions! It can live up to 600 years and has fallen victim to the ravages of time on more than one occasion, with its most recent demise happening during the Great Storm of 1975.

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